8 things you should know before going to Japan

If you are about to travel to this crazy country, you should know a few things before getting infected by a culture shock!

Japanese people can’t say “no”

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somehow 

Well, that’s not bad right? But it is, when you are lost & ask strangers for the direction. Japanese can’t lose their faces and say “I don’t know”. They  will just tell you “eeh.. I thinks it’s this way” even though they have no idea. You should at least ask 3 people, or visit a local police cabin right away. Those police stations are simply there to help you if you’re lost or something like that, as Japans criminality is pretty low.

If you meet someone important, bow down!

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Short explanation

 

The deeper you bow, the more respect you show. This would be appreciated if you’re about to meet someone importent, like the boss of a company or a priest.

 

 

Bring cash instead of a credit card!

You should exchange your money at the airport before you go somewhere. Even though Japan is such a futuristic country, it’s also very traditional. So in most stores, you pay with cash (they also prefer if you give them just the right amount of money). There are a lot if ATM’s so don’t worry if you forget to exchange at the airport.

Don’t leave tips!

Seriously, in Japan it’s like you’d tell them they’d need money. Not even to the taxi driver! Even though the waitress is extremely friendly and helpful, it’s their culture, they don’t want anything in exchange. I’ve even heard that a taxi driver ran after some people just to give them back their money.

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an example

“Modern” toilets?

Everybody knows that the Japanese have the most crazy toilets; some play music, some of them even talk to you, but not everywhere! If you go to a public toilet, be aware to find only a hole on the ground. Japan, futuristic & traditional.

 

Enjoy going by train as a tourist!

There’s a cheap train ticket, only available for tourists! It’s the Japan Rail Pass! You can choose the regions (for example the main island “Honshu“) and the duration (1-2 weeks) and you pay a small amount of money (depending, 300-400$) and you drive train during these weeks! It’s pretty useful, trust me. Check it out on: www.japanrailpass.net

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Looks like a passport

The adapter plug!

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looks like this

This is a common thing to be forgotten when travelling to another country! Just go to a electric store in your country and ask for an adapter plug for Japan. If you forget to (like I did) there are adapters available in most hotels, don’t worry.

Avoid Summer in Japan

Summer in Japan is veeeery hot. And wet. That’s because the Taifun season takes place in Summer. Even though it’s hot, the air-condioning is going crazy, so watch out of getting a cold. Check out the weather before you go.

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Source “T-Online”

Well, I hope there few things have been helpful for you to plan your trip to Japan. Don’t worry, it’s just nice to know, but If you forget one of those things, they will just kindly remind you!

Sabrina
(all pictures in this post belong to their owners & are not mine)

Some unnecessary knowledge about Japan

Japan can be a strange country sometimes, but that’s one more reason I love it so much! I’ve researched some of my favorite facts about this extraordinary place on earth to share them with you:

You can buy isles in Japan!
They may not be cheap or too big but hey, an isle in Japan! If you are interested anyway, go check out www.aqua-styles.com/island_japan.html

The biggest crossing in the world
is of course, the famous Shibuya Crossing! Everytime the light goes green, up to 15’000 people are crossing the street!

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The Shibuya crossing from above, right next to the Shibuya train station.

Oshiya – Pushing people for a living? 
Maybe you’ve already seen it on TV or social media; a man in uniform, that pushes people into a full train – and that’s his job! Well, what else do you expect in a 40 million people city at rush hour? (Ps. Oshiyas exist since 1955)

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A very old picture of Oshiyas, pushing commutes into the train!

Hikikomori?
Japanese people, mostly young people, that live in their room. Only their room. For months or worse – even years! Yes, like the nerds in the movies that only watch Animes & play video games the whole day, but that’s not funny at all! They are overwhelmed by the tough Japanese society. Even the parents are ashamed to have a Hikikomori in their family, so they don’t talkabout it. Because of that reason, many Hikikomoris don’t get the help they’d need.

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Illustration of a Hikikomori

Fell asleep at work? Totally OK in Japan!

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“He must have been working hard”


Inemuri – that’s how they call it. Which means being awake physically but asleep in mind. There are any reasons: The Japanese have very long working hours & u
sually long trips to work, so there’s no time for sleep. So if you sleep at work, your colleagues will think “he must have been working very hard”

 

What does the chicken say?
In Japan, they use animal sounds (like meow or bark) for some animals, we wouldn’t even guess! some examples:

Cat/Neko                                    “Nya” (kinda accurate)
Dog/Inu                                      “Wan Wan” (hmm)
Chicken/Niwatori                     “kokekokko” (I mean, what?)
Kickup/Kakkou                         “ho hokekyo”    (say it loud!)
Horse/Uma                                 “hihiin“(depends on the pronunciation, I guess)
Monkey/Saru                             “kikii“(Never, ever heard a monkey speak)

Of course there are many more strange things about Japan, but for now this must be enough. Stay tuned for more soon!

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“KOKEKOKKO !!”

All pictures in this posts are not mine and belong to their creators

When the sun goes down in Tokyo

If you want to see the city view of Tokyo from above for free, (not like Tokyo Tower or Tokyo Skytree) then your option is the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building!

The Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building has a height of 243 meters. If you enter the building, go to the elevators – there’s an extra elevator that only goes to floor 45,which is free of charge!

You can look out of the windows and enjoy the view of beautiful Tokyo. There are even gift stores and Cafes! So amazing, I wish I’d have spent more time there.

Unfortunately, there were some clouds at the horizon, orherwise I would have spotted Mount Fuji!